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Dec 3, 2018

The news includes:

  • MyHeritage announced Shared Ancestral Places, a new facility in its MyHeritage DNA.
  • MyHeritage announced that artifact testing is on its way.
  • MyHeritage held a very successful conference, MyHeritage LIVE, in Oslo, Norway, and videos of the keynote by Gilad Japhet and 23 other presentations are available for free at https://familytreewebinars.com/MHLIVE2018.
  • Findmypast has added 106K Pennsylvania Cemetery & Burial records, and a variety of English and Scotland military records.
  • Findmypast has partnered with Living DNA to launch a new discovery experience with a breakdown of 80 global regions, including 21 across Britain and Ireland.
  • FamilySearch is partnering with the Dallas Public Library to digitize the library’s extensive family history book collection.
  • FamilySearch announced free access to more than 150 million Italian historical genealogical records.
  • Drew summarizes the new and updated collections at FamilySearch.

Drew reviews two new books:

  • Nathan Dylan Goodwin has published a new book, Ghost Swifts, Blue Poppies, and the Red Star. It introduces a new character, Mrs. Harriett Agnes McDougall, who investigates the circumstances surrounding her son’s death during the Great War.
  • Family Tree Books has published a new edition of Nancy Hendrickson’s book, The Unofficial Guide to Ancestry.com. The new book provides great advice for maximizing your use and searches of Ancestry.com and features new chapters about AncestryDNA.

Drew explains what the recent announcement means that in rare instances a male can pass mitochondrial DNA to his offspring.

Listener email includes:

  • Susie thanks George for his recent presentations in Roswell, New Mexico, and says she has already been applying new techniques she learned in a recent research trip to Vermont.
  • Statch thanks The Guys for a recent blog post about money used in colonial America. They remind people to read the blog at http://blog.genealogyguys.com where they will find that post and recent posts about:
    • Using a perpetual calendar
    • School records
    • Online library reference resources
    • African Americans and Native Americans
    • Hispanic resources
    • Jewish resources
  • Linda thanks The Guys for explaining why the Castle Garden website and Stephen Morse’s One-Step searches reveal different results. She also recommends Amy Johnson Crow’s Generations Café podcast and specifically her episode on Overlooked Things on FamilySearch.
  • John shared his experience with searching census records for his family surname, how the enumerators butchered it, and how he used various keywords for his ancestor’s medical profession to locate misspelled and mis-indexed records.
  • Laura turned on FamilySearch WebHints in her RootsMagic database and found many new records. In particular, she describes three marriage records that provided new insights for her family.
  • Van is caught up with listening to all of our podcasts! He writes about research into South Carolina records and discusses questions about family groups found. Included are the used of DNA in this research.
  • Joseph wrote in response to Beth’s Mennonite research in Episode #352, and provided some reference sites to help with Pennsylvania Mennonite research:
  • Daniel responded from Spain about Laura’s DNA “mess” and raised the issue of financial impacts of sharing the stories.
  • Kelvin wrote about DNA artifact testing and comments on how helpful he is finding discussions on the Genetic Genealogy Tips & Techniques Facebook group. Interested listeners may want to join.
  • Tedi asked about genealogical software that can be used on both a desktop and iPad.

The Guys discussed a brand-new DNA tool, Genetic Affairs, which can currently be used with your AncestryDNA, 23andMe, and Family Tree DNA results in order to cluster results. The tool’s website is at http://geneticaffairs.com and has a 12-page manual available for download.